Bitter gourd, pumpkin, and long beans…

Been very busy with work lately…
Bitter gourd is standard fare on our dining table… 
My sweeto haato specifically says, ‘grow the long type and not the stubby type’…
They are quite easy to grow… at this point of time, we have on record a harvest of 54 fruits…
My missus tried to make this dish (known as Yong Tau Foo in Malaysia) and they tasted, yes, bitter… but good…
Pumpkin too, is a staple for us in the summer…
This season, managed to harvest five of them, totaling 8.1 kilos…
Gave one to a neighbor…
I don’t know what it is but the yellow pumpkin seeds I bought from Los Angeles some time ago had never given me any good harvest…
After growing to a certain size, they begin to wrinkle away, and eventually, drop off altogether…
So, I decided to just harvest them young, very young…
We had them with the bitter gourd dish above…
Long beans… I love…
They are a very convenient veggie to grow…
You harvest and they keep producing…
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About Lrong

Gardening, I adore... Photography, I cherish... Scuba diving, I fancy... Shakuhachi, I relish... and barefoot walking, I revel in...
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31 Responses to Bitter gourd, pumpkin, and long beans…

  1. Ash says:

    You are truly blessed with good veggies produced from farm straight to the table. I have not seen that long bitter gourd before. Is it as bitter as the round one?

  2. Liz says:

    The bitter gourd looks sensational. I've never knowingly eaten it, maybe I should try it before I grow it 54 fruits is quite a lot…

  3. The bitter gourd looks interesting Lrong…do you think it might grow in the Isle of Man or does it need warmer climates?

  4. rainfield61 says:

    I drink mixed juice of bitter gourd and cucumber every morning.

  5. Lrong says:

    Thank you, Ash… my missus and I are forever thankful to god for this life we are leading now… blissful, really… my better half prefers the taste of the long type as opposed to the round one… she says the long type is easier to cut and handle, and is less fibrous on the insides… as for bitterness, we think the long type is less so…

  6. Lrong says:

    Liz, think it is an acquired taste, if bitter is not your strong point… and my missus just mumbled that if you like beer, then maybe you can like bitter gourd…

  7. Lrong says:

    Dear Tanya… the Bee Gees were originally from the Isle of Man, right? They are probably one of my most, most favorite singers… as with the bitter gourd, if you can grow cucumbers, then I think you might be able to do likewise with bitter gourd as well… good luck… :=)

  8. Lrong says:

    Woah, that sounds like a real refreshing drink to take in the mornings… is it with ice?

  9. Carrie says:

    this is a delightful blog, so glad to have stumbled upon you via Down on the Allotment :)Oh and cherry blossoms galore – I am in heaven!Best wishes from N Ireland x

  10. Lrong says:

    Hi Carrie… likewise, it is a delight to have you visiting this little blog… shall be looking up your blog later on…

  11. Malar says:

    54 bittergourd? wow! How your swwet hatto cook with it?Anyway do you receive any malware warning when go to my blog? I don't knw why…..but no danger actually since I try using another acc to enter…strange….

  12. I don't know any other dish using goya in Japan except okinawa famous goya champo. Is there any other popular Japanese dish using goya in honshu or other parts?

  13. Matron says:

    I've seen bitter gourds for sale in Asian shops here in England, I might like to try them. How do you cook them? how bitter are they?

  14. Hi Lrong,I’ve never eaten Bitter Gourd-must try it sometime…

  15. Lrong says:

    Several ways… masala fry, raw salad, stir fry with garlic, etc… No, I have not experience any malware as yet…

  16. Lrong says:

    Goya champur remains the most popular recipe as far as I know…

  17. Lrong says:

    They can be quite bitter… the bitterness can be lessened if sliced thinly… some folks rub salt with the slices to further remove the bitterness… you can treat the gourd as you do with Asian greens… so you can stir fry them with meat or shrimps…

  18. Lrong says:

    It may taste a bit like medicine to you the first time you try it… :=)

  19. Delicious combination of vegetables! And brilliant idea with the uncooperative squash. Is the bitter gourd less bitter if picked younger?

  20. They are all lovely… yeap, I may try bitter gourds soon!

  21. I would call your yellow pumpkin a gem squash. That was a vegetable I missed so much in Switzerland. Till I found them at a farmer's market with the Italian name of rondini.

  22. Yes they are/were…one of their members died this year and it made the local paper.I don't think that bitter gourd would be available on the island so I'm considering growing a plant next year. Thanks for the tip 🙂

  23. Stephanie says:

    Oh yes I recognise that yong tau foo. I knew that before reading the text haha… my favourite dish. Btw, bitter gourds are bitter but special. It is this kind of taste that I like from this fruit hehe…

  24. Lrong says:

    Think they are bitter when young, but they become somewhat sweeter when they ripen as they turn orange in color…

  25. Lrong says:

    You are an expert in growing veggies and fruits… good luck…

  26. Lrong says:

    Rondini… that's a new term for me… shall look it up and see…

  27. Lrong says:

    Right on, about the taste of the bitter gourd…

  28. Mac says:

    Love bitter gourd, but the little stubby ones are too bitter for me, I prefer the long variety, have you tried the white variety?

  29. Autumn Belle says:

    Bitter gourd is my favourite vege. Besides in YTF, I like it in omelettes, clear soups and bitter-gourd with chicken. Haha, this reminds me of my grandma who used to tease us grandchildren of having a 'bitter gourd chicken – fu kwa kai' face whenever we cry or put on a sour face.

  30. Lrong says:

    The white ones are apparently more mild in taste… we prefer the long green ones…

  31. Lrong says:

    Bitter gourd with chicken… hmmm, haven't tried this dish as yet…

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