Potager Y destroyed by Typhoon 11…

Was away in Indonesia for a while (see report here)…
And when we returned to Japan, Typhoon 11 was there to welcome us…

It has been quite a while since Shikoku has such a massive typhoon coming straight on…
All limousine buses to Shikoku from Kansai International were cancelled…
My missus rightly decided that we immediately zoomed to Okayama by bullet train, but there again, all buses and trains to Shikoku were called off…
Luckily, my missus promptly talked to two like-minded travelers to share a taxi to take us back to Shikoku…
The fare came up to almost US$250, split into four passengers…
After alighting from the taxi, we still had to get to the car park which was almost one hour’s drive away…
And one of the travelers was too kind to call up her husband to drive us all the way to the car park…
We reached home at about 5:00 pm, and that very night, Typhoon 11 razed over Shikoku,with winds howling and rains thundering…

The next morning, I inspected the potager…
It was, I’d say, about 80% destroyed…
Before the typhoon, looking at the foot marks and the mess created, I could see that the potager had already been ransacked by wild boar…

The corn, the Japanese yam, the zucchini, particularly suffered much damage from the wild boar…
Added to that, the typhoon tore down the bamboo stakes that I had put up for the cucumbers, loofah, pumpkin, and wild grapes…
The fierce winds had slapped the leaves of all plants into pulp…
There is much to be done to resurrect the garden, but I am due to head to Thailand and Indonesia in less than a week’s time…
It will be a month later, when I return…
I would have to work fast to get the potager back on track for the autumn crops…

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Ok, now let us switch to something more pictorial…
This corn crop was harvested before leaving for the trip to Indonesia…
There is really nothing like tasting your own corn, fresh from the garden…

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The red  amaranth survived the  typhoon…
But I guess there was not enough to make for a harvest…

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My sweeto-haato loves eating the loofah…
And this season, I planted a lot of them…
They had stood proudly on the bamboo stakes, leaves healthy, flowers perching for attention…
Until the advent of Typhoon 11…
The plants were literally bashed up with leaves hurting, and fruits blown away…
I managed to pick a fruit or two to cook…
The above picture shows the dish that I churned out…

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I enjoy consuming the okra…
Unfortunately, this year, the okra plants did not do well to begin with…
They ended up slanting, due to the winds…

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The eggplants too, did not do too well this time…
I could harvest just a little of the fruits…

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This self-seeded, lone Ebisu pumpkin was thrown off by the winds…
I wonder if it would taste good as it might be a little pre-mature…

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Yes, the cucumber is one vegetable that you would like to sink your teeth into as soon as possible…
So you grow several plants, hoping that they would fruit fast…
After the typhoon, I counted 15 over-sized (some the size of my arm), mature fruits…
Now, what can one do with these ‘giant’ cucumbers, especially when they come to you all at the same time?

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About Lrong

Gardening, I adore... Photography, I cherish... Scuba diving, I fancy... Shakuhachi, I relish... and barefoot walking, I revel in...
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29 Responses to Potager Y destroyed by Typhoon 11…

  1. Mrs. N says:

    Wow Lrong- I was so sad to read this. Really. I know how much work you put into your potager. The weather has been just terrible here too. We have barely had a summer- it’s been raining and raining… Since June! We had a couple of nice days here and there but then it just goes back to rain. I’m hoping for the best for you!

    • Lrong says:

      Yeap Connie, put in a lot of effort, but can’t fault the weather… there has been so much rain these days… the gods must be making it up for the lack of rain last summer… thank you for your comforting words…

  2. Dq Farm says:

    Bro, condolences. I know the heartbreak – farmer’s lot I guess. Best of luck.

  3. Autumn Belle says:

    I’m so sorry to hear about the terrible typhoon. My heart breaks to see all your hard work gone and your potager damaged. So sad but I hope you and your wife will have sunny days again. Take care and make pickles from your excess vegetables. I’ll pray that the typhoon will disappear never to return to your area again.

    • Lrong says:

      Dear Autumn Belle…
      Thank you for your encouragement…
      Sad, yes, but we are working to get things up and running again…
      We have had cucumbers from last year’s harvest and we are still eating them… 🙂
      So, although I didn’t want to do it, the over matured cucumbers are returning to the field as ‘fertilizers’…

  4. Hi Lrong and Yoshimi, it doesn’t feel so nice to hear friends from other countries also affected by typhoons. My friends here in the country have’t fully recovered, and now you in Japan and another friend in Hilo Hawaii is already in their 9th day without electricity. This is now the common experiences on earth, which is very saddening! On the lighter tone, I reall appreciate your photos and compositions, they don’t show any hint of they’ve been through. And of course you really write very very well, so pleasant to read even if the topic is not as pleasant. Be safe, we can always bring the crops blooming again sometime!

    • Lrong says:

      Hi Andrea… thank you for your kind words… it seems that weather is turning a bit havoc of late… we will just have to see what we can do and continue to push on… hopefully, the vegetables will fourish again in due time…

  5. Robbie says:

    aww Lrong I had no idea you went through this 😦 Your potager is a special place! I understand when it is destroyed by animals or winds it is hard to deal with since we work so hard out there trying to make it produce our food and look beautiful. I remember when we had a huge wind that ripped through here and took down trees and left the street covered in fallen trees and we were without electricity for a week. It is so hard to deal with and frustrating when you don’t have time to get the work done…but there is always next year, but you can’t even count on that since mother nature has her own agenda + we have to roll with what she throws our way…so sorry to hear…good to hear you are okay.
    Your pictures are beautiful as usual + your food looks yum! I never have grow corn I don’t have enough room. We are getting a heat spell here + this is the summer of “icky” tasting tomatoes! The taste of the food does respond to the weather….blessings sent your way:-)
    🙂 robbie ..

    • Lrong says:

      Hi Robbie… thank you for your kind thoughts… looks like you have had a more trying experience than what I am going through… our house did not suffer any damage, and the electricity was ok… well, as you rightly said, we can always look forward to the next season… for sure there will be some rather substantial changes in the way I do things in the garden… the weather, we cannot do much, but the wild boar disturbances, I need to plan something to discourage their presence… happy gardening to you, Robbie…

  6. jeannietay says:

    You must be so sad to see the damaged done! But I am sure you can put it back together again, you have very green fingers:) Love the photos they are so clear!

  7. seniorhiker says:

    I’m sorry to hear about the damage caused by the typhoon (and the boar). Since I grew up on a farm I can appreciate the sense of loss you must have felt.

  8. malar says:

    I’m sorry to read about the damage! It’s really hard to see our hard work gone just like that! Anyway enjoy your harvest, have a safe trip and update us once you’re back! 😉
    .

  9. Robbie says:

    Hi lrong:-) I have the patch of “Molokhia” ( sp not sure) + I am exploring how to use it in other recipes. Do you think it is best for soup only. I have been reading a bit + want to know if I can susitute it in recipes for other veggies? It does have a different texture that may not work. I love the flavor raw! I was wondering can you eat it raw? What other things can you cook with it? It is a beautiful plant? Do I collect seeds after it blooms? I am trying to eat it now, so curious how to do all this stuff. I know you are busy:-) I’ll stop by again and see if you are back and outside in the garden:-) from your over the cyber fence gardening friend-robbie:-)

  10. Robbie says:

    I sure am not spelling well lately–subsitutue-lol. The seeds you gave me grew into the most beautiful plant!

  11. Robbie says:

    plant”S” would be better..I have a patch of it! Will it reseed? My shiso does every year which is great + I love the color of my britoon shiso

    • Lrong says:

      Hi Robbie
      How are you? I am actually in Thailand right now, taking along 8 students with me on a field trip study… so, I am away from my garden at the moment…
      It is marvelous to hear that your ‘molokhia’ is growing beautifully.
      The spelling is correct, and there are apparently several ways to spell it.
      My preference is ‘moroheya’ as this is the way the Japanese people pronounce it.
      I believe you can use it in numerous ways.
      We have done a quite a bit of experimenting but I enjoy it best as a soup.
      The Thais, as I found out, use it to make noodles.
      We have tried blanching it, and mixing it with sesame seeds.
      There is a Japanese cook webpage that has tenths of recipes using molokhia. And I believe you certainly can use it as a substitute for other vegetables. Happy experimenting…
      I have not tried eating it raw as yet, so I might try it out when I return to Japan.
      My wife does not use the flowers in our cooking as she said that she learnt from a Japanese source that they are toxic in a way.
      I have yet to confirm if this is indeed true.
      The seeds will take quite a long time to mature. You will know it as it will turn brown.
      If you just let it be, it should reseed by itself.

      • Robbie says:

        that is exciting! Good to know about the seeds may be toxic..I am glad I did not eat the flowers-yikes! I really enjoyed the flavor. I will check out the site. I am thrilled it will reseed so I’ll just leave it where it is and hope it reseeds!
        How excting to be on a field trip + hope you are all enjoying your time…thank you so much for your timely response. I will add it to my soups + try the soup and see what that tastes like…hmmm…I read you can pour it over rice, so I may try that too:-)

  12. narf77 says:

    What a terrible thing to happen. I guess we really don’t realise the true power of Mother Nature until she lets herself be felt. It is a real credit to you that you picked up and carried on. We have our own battles here with native animals and its a sort of 3 steps forward, 2 steps back event to garden here. I am attempting to grow okra this year and it will be interesting to see if our short growing season will allow me to do so. Pickle those huge cucumbers. Best way to save them for later 🙂

    • Lrong says:

      Yes, besides the roller coaster with mother-nature, the ‘fight’ with native (and non-native too) animals is a never ending process… I like your ‘3-steps forward, 2-steps backward’ analogy… this season, I think the wild boars came to our garden about 10 times… it is really like 3-up, 2-downs…

      • narf77 says:

        I think Wild boars tops even the tenacity of our possums. We ended up creating a tennis court sized, fully enclosed vegetable garden from netting that we got free from a local salmon farm when they were re-netting their pens. If seals can’t chew through it, we didn’t think possums would stand a chance. Now we have a patch that we can garden without worrying about it disappearing into possums at night. Possums are tenacious but wild boars are tasty. Especially when they have been snacking on your vegetables. I would love to see a good Malaysian or Japanese recipe for wild boar 😉

      • Lrong says:

        You are right about the wild boars… to put is simply, they are really destructive… some days ago, I stood in the potager, and for a moment, I thought that a tractor just came by and tilled our land without our knowledge… I am actually contemplating if I should get a license to trap wild boars… I do enjoy their meat, especially in curries, so it might be a good idea to kill two birds with one stone… I am not familiar with possums, so I looked it up in the net… and I am glad the Japanese folks did not introduce the animal into Japan… they did with the raccoon, and they are highly destructive too although not to the level of wild boar… I appreciate your comment on your fully enclosed garden… I might just try to that to my potager… 🙂

      • narf77 says:

        Trapping boars would be a great idea if they are destroying your garden. If you are allowed to eat them that would be a karmic bonus ;). We used ex fish-farm netting to enclose our garden so it didn’t cost us a lot to do. We are all about low cost gardening and try to find ways to do everything as cheaply as we can by recycling and re-using wherever possible. The netting was a huge bonus and allowed us to protect our vegetables and give us back some hope that we might be able to produce food on our little patch of land. Hope is a wonderful thing 🙂

      • Lrong says:

        Good to know that we are very much on the same wavelength with regards to ‘low cost gardening’… I try to do as much recycling as possible too… there are wooden pellets that I can pick up from the nearby factories… and bamboo that I can get from the neighborhood forests… 🙂

      • narf77 says:

        I am just about to plant out my bamboo. I want it to go mental all over the place. People keep saying to me “it will go crazy!” I will be most happy when it does :).

  13. Nature has a way of letting us know she’s there…so happy you’re wanting to get back into gardening and straightening things out…so your potager will be back producing in no time!

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