Late summer, early autumn harvests

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Part of my day job requires me to make quite a bit of overseas travel, some of which can be rather long…
Upon returning from one of those trips, I found the chestnuts had dropped onto the ground…
Many of them had rotted, or were eaten by bugs…
Collected some that looked ok, at least, visually…
But it was not to be… my sweeto-haato cut them open, and found out that each and every one of them turned out to be bad inside… sad…

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I did not get to harvest sweet potatoes for the last two seasons of 2014 and 2015…
As above, I had to go for business trips overseas, and each time for the past two years, the wild boars came and ransacked the sweet potatoes…
This year, I was determined to block their advance…
Thank god, we got to harvest the sweet potatoes this time…

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Garlic is a regular item at our potager…
Luckily, the wild animals have no interest in them…

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We got to enjoy bitter gourd throughout the summer, and well into early autumn as well…
I cannot imagine our summers without this vegetable…

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Now, this is another sad story… the navel oranges…
Was really happy to see so many fruits in early summer…
But as the fruits matured, they split, from the navel…
Apparently, the reason is that, the fruits cannot cope well with changes in the water content in the ground, especially if the changes are too much or too rapid…
I collected over 100 split navel oranges, and had to throw them away…
There are perhaps about 20 or so fruits left, and I hope we can get to taste them soon…

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About Lrong

Gardening, I adore... Photography, I cherish... Scuba diving, I fancy... Shakuhachi, I relish... and barefoot walking, I revel in...
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9 Responses to Late summer, early autumn harvests

  1. narf7 says:

    Our wallabies love the taste of alliums and eat the garlic leaves as they grow but that doesn’t seem to put a dent in the tubers. I am really glad that you got some sweet potatoes this year. I am just about to plant a couple of hazelnut and chestnut trees. I will remember to keep an eye on them and ensure I collect them before they fall. Sorry to hear about your navel oranges. It’s been a strange old year all over the world. Here in Tasmania, we have had almost double our annual rainfall for winter which has caused large native trees to topple over as their roots can’t hold onto the mud. Here’s hoping you get a bumper crop next season 🙂

    • Lrong says:

      Your mentioning of the hazelnut trees… was actually contemplating if I should get the seedling or not… hmmm… let’s see if I can find some space to put it…

      • narf7 says:

        I have seen hazelnuts in a small quarter acre block growing magnificently alongside 2 avocados and a lot of espalier plum, apple and other fruit trees with fruiting vines growing in among them. Hazelnuts are excellent because you can coppice (cut them down to the ground) and they will grow back happily. They are the best nut tree to grow if you have a small area available. I would love to see a hazelnut tree in your lovely garden 🙂

  2. Ght says:

    Your land is truly god’s gift!

  3. malar says:

    The harvest look so good!
    The split oranges not edible? oh dear! Hope the balance 20 fruits will be fine for your picking! 😉

  4. KL says:

    Lucky you harvesting such good sweet potato. I could not harvest much this year. That’s the problem with gardening fruits/veggies — they too much depend on weather/water.

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